Tag Archives: World War II

Montana Mine Correspondence

22 Nov
I love the letterhead symbol on this one. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

Honestly, I just love the letterhead symbol on this one. If you look closely you can see parts of a tank. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

Lately I’ve been working my way through the correspondence series of the Montana Mine Collection. The majority of the correspondence, outside of that which is related to the financial business of the mine, is actually from a later period of the mine’s existence, when it was owned by a Mr. Hugo Miller. Most of this is the Miller family’s personal correspondence, offering an interesting insight into the lives of this entrepreneurial southern Arizona family.

As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

Living with a miner is never easy! As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

Miller owned an assay office in Nogales and mined on the side. It was not uncommon in the past for men and women with minds for business and an eye for good opportunities to work a mining claim into their business investments. Even now it’s not unusual for private citizens here in Arizona to have ownership of a small mine in the area that they work on periodically as they have free time. The letter you see below is an excerpt from a letter from Mrs. Gladys Miller to a friend and mentions the reality of living with the sort of jack-of-all-trades entrepreneur of a man that Mr. Miller was. From the excerpt you can tell that the Millers had great business acumen, even taking  boarders in their house to make some extra money. This correspondence suggests that the Miller family was a hard working one.

The letter below was interesting because of the context of the attached newspaper clipping. Again, this is a rare glimpse into the daily realities of living in past times. In this case, wartime rationing takes center stage as a friend, Edna, writes to ask whether the newspaper article is true and then asks her friend, Gladys, to purchase extra Nylons for her! Rationing during wartime meant people had to get creative in their daily lives to continue on as normally as possible. Having a friend who could easily get across the border to purchase stockings in Mexico definitely would have been an advantage. This is just another example of how people worked together and created good relationships during times of hardship.

As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

A clever way to circumvent wartime rationing. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

These letters are all great examples of how the correspondence in a collection can yield really interesting insights into the past. Whether it’s fun snippets such as these I’ve shared above or more serious historical connections, correspondence is always a treasure trove of historical moments.

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Veterans Day

11 Nov

The Arizona Historical Society is closed today Monday, November 11, 2013, for Veterans Day. Stay tuned later this week for a special post detailing our future closures for the rest of 2013. The photo you see below is from a photo file on the Women’s Auxiliary Army Corps which was formed as a branch of the U.S. Army in May 1942. Women have not always held prominent positions in the military and increasing rights for women who want to join the armed forces is an interesting part of American history. Take some time with your daughters AND sons this Veterans Day to talk about the evolving role of women in America’s military.

Subjects-WorldWar-WAAC2_73716. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

Subjects-WorldWar-WAAC2_73716. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

Mexican Heritage Project Event this Saturday!

21 Aug
Fliers for the Mexican Heritage Project event can be picked up in the Arizona Historical Society Library & Archives.

Fliers for the Mexican Heritage Project event can be picked up in the Arizona Historical Society Library & Archives.

In celebration of Tucson’s 238th birthday The Arizona Historical Society presents a panel discussion with the founders and leaders of the Mexican Heritage Project- Patricia Preciado Martin, Dr. Thomas Sheridan and Dr. Norma González  

When: Saturday, August 24, 2013, from 10:30-12:00pm
Where: Arizona Historical Society in Tucson (949 E. 2nd Street)
Free to the Public (please enter through the Auditorium doors to the right of the main entrance)
 
Background:
Mexican Heritage Project Photographs: La Herencia del Pueblo was a groundbreaking effort at the Arizona Historical Society to help preserve and tell a story of Tucson’s Mexican American community from the Gadsden Purchase until World War II. During its approximately five years of active collecting by scholars, field historians, archivists, librarians and community members, the Mexican Heritage Project collected business papers, oral histories, diaries and over 4,000 historical photographs directly from community members, all of which were catalogued and added to the permanent collection of the Arizona Historical Society Library and Archives in Tucson. The photographic collection has been accessible to researchers at AHS as individual photos since the mid 1980s, but has never before been viewable or searchable as a united collection. Technology now allows for digital unification of this rich and varied collection of photographs spanning the 1860s through the 1950s. These photographs portray a wide range of subjects, including formal studio portraits of individuals and groups, street scenes, parades, wedding portraits, interiors, ranch scenes, musical groups, workers, theatrical productions, school class photos, and casual family snapshots. If you wish to donate photographs to our collections or if you have additional information to share, please contact us at: ahsref@azhs.gov .
 
This project was supported with funds granted by the Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records Agency, a division of the Arizona Secretary of State, under the Library, Services and Technology Act, which is administered by the Institute of Museum and Library Services.
 
Visit the digital exhibit of the Mexican Heritage Project Photographs collection, which is hosted online by the Arizona Memory Project.
 
 

Mexican Heritage Project Exhibit in the Arizona History Museum

18 Jul

The Library and Archives is proud to announce that a new exhibit featuring photographs from the Library and Archives’ Mexican Heritage Project is now up in the Arizona History Museum here in Tucson. Mexican Heritage Project Photographs: La Herencia del Pueblo was a groundbreaking effort at the Arizona Historical Society to help preserve and tell a story of Tucson’s Mexican American community from the Gadsden Purchase through World War II. Exhibit curators Alexandria Caster and Lizeth Zepeda created an exhibit to highlight some of the amazing images from the collection. For more information on the Mexican Heritage Project, check out its front page on the Arizona Memory Project website then have some fun looking through the photos. And the next time you’re in Tucson come by the Arizona History Museum and see the physical exhibit!

A small peek at the Library & Archives' new exhibit in the Arizona History Museum featuring the Mexican Heritage Project.

A small peek at the Library & Archives’ new exhibit in the Arizona History Museum featuring the Mexican Heritage Project.

Memorial Day

27 May

Today is Memorial Day and all across the USA families and friends are getting together to wave small flags at parades, bbq a ton of meat, and remember the men and women who served our country in the United States Armed Forces and died doing their duty.

Memorial Day is different from Veterans Day, though many people get them mixed up. Memorial Day was specifically started to remember those who died in the Armed Forces, while Veterans Day celebrates those living and dead. However contemporary celebrations often involve expressing thanks to currently serving and surviving troops in addition to those who passed away in the line of duty.

While you’re eating your hamburgers, potato salad and grilled veggies today, take a minute to talk to your kids about why we celebrate holidays like Memorial Day. War always causes opinions and perspectives to swirl on many sides, and our armed forces tend to get caught up in the middle of things. Rather than focusing on the politics of war, talk to your kids about the history behind the USA Armed Forces. If you have ancestors who served in wars, bring out photos or documents kept by your family to help connect your family history with the history of our country. Memorial Day is a great opportunity to connect children with their own family history and how it relates to the broader scope of US history.

In observance of Memorial Day, the Library & Archives will be closed all day today, Monday May 27, 2013. Don’t worry…we’ll be open again tomorrow!

PC 1000- Subjects-Wars-World War II (Part 2)-W.A.A.C.

PC 1000- Subjects-Wars-World War II (Part 2)-W.A.A.C.