Tag Archives: women

Need gift ideas for this holiday season? Buy digital scans of beautiful posters from our archive!

9 Dec

Need gift ideas for this holiday season?

The Arizona Historical Society Library & Archives in Tucson has some posters for sale in their reading room!

A digital scan of any of select posters are $29, and they also have some selected maps for $35.

PosterPic

Some of our selected posters that we digitally scanned and are ready to come home with you!

Come by the reading room to see what is on sale! We are open Monday – Friday 9am-4pm or contact the library at ahsref@azhs.gov or (520) 617 – 1157, if you’re interested or have any questions.

*For personal use only, not for publication.

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Veterans Day

11 Nov

The Arizona Historical Society is closed today Monday, November 11, 2013, for Veterans Day. Stay tuned later this week for a special post detailing our future closures for the rest of 2013. The photo you see below is from a photo file on the Women’s Auxiliary Army Corps which was formed as a branch of the U.S. Army in May 1942. Women have not always held prominent positions in the military and increasing rights for women who want to join the armed forces is an interesting part of American history. Take some time with your daughters AND sons this Veterans Day to talk about the evolving role of women in America’s military.

Subjects-WorldWar-WAAC2_73716. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

Subjects-WorldWar-WAAC2_73716. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

Women in Mining Towns: A Look at the Past through Accident Reports

28 Jun

A couple of months ago as I processed the Montana Mine collection I found myself sifting through the Accident Reports for the mine. As I was placing them into the appropriate folders, certain accidents became familiar to me: dirt/rock chip in the eye, small wounds like cuts, bumps on the head, sprained this or that and the occasional broken bone.  There were other and more serious injuries of course, but the majority of things seemed pretty minor in that they wouldn’t keep the miner from his work for more than a few days. These were all very interesting of course, but what was most interesting to me was the amount of accident reports that were present for women. There were not many of them, especially compared to the reports filed by men, so I noticed them pretty quickly and once I did I kept track of them. The pictures you’ll see in this post are scans of a few of my favorites.

I was struck by their presence in the collection. I had not really thought about women in Ruby working for the Montana Mine. I had assumed that they were probably all housewives with sweet, rosy-cheeked picturesque children. I was happy to find that there were women in Ruby working for the Montana Mine who were married, single, and even widowed. Women of many ages were represented in the reports from those in their 20s to those in their 40s. Though it doesn’t seem they were employed in the actual mine itself, we can see that they helped run the boarding house, kitchens and hospitals kept by the Eagle-Picher Mining Company in Ruby. This is a reflection of the kind of work women were doing at that moment in history. A lot has changed since then! Another tidbit I found interesting, is the actual Accident Report form that was filled out. Rather than use the term “employee” to refer to the injured person, the forms all use the word “man.” As they were filling out the forms, some people crossed out the “man” and wrote “woman” or added the “wo” to the typed form letters and some didn’t bother to change it at all. These observations are all a snapshot of a certain moment in history when women in the workforce were not as prominent as they are today and often limited to a very specific set of jobs. You’ve come a long way, ladies!

Want to learn more about Ruby, Arizona and the Montana Mine? Pick up a copy of “Ruby, Arizona: Mining, Mayhem and Murder” by Bob Ring, Al Ring and Tallia Pfrimmer Cahoon. Copies are available in the Mercantile here at the Arizona Historical Society!

Two accident reports from the Montana Mine collection.

Two accident reports from the Montana Mine collection. Yikes! These both probably hurt a lot! Check out the difference in pay per month.

This Accident Report is written in faded pencil, so it's harder to see. Interesting that the accident was deemed "unavoidable." I guess all jobs have a certain amount of risk.

This Accident Report is written in faded pencil, so it’s harder to see. Interesting that the accident was deemed “unavoidable.” I guess all jobs have a certain amount of risk.

Notice that in the left one, "Man's" is XXXed out and "Woman's" typed in.

Notice that in the left one, “Man’s” is XXXed out and “Woman’s” typed in. Jennie Gover’s accident description is really detailed and the incorrect pronouns corrected throughout the Accident Report. In the Accident Report on the right side, Mrs. Gover is listed as the shift boss.

Clubbing

26 Apr

Women’s History Month is over, but women’s history isn’t! In that spirit, we have pulled together some of AHS-Tucson’s collections that document Arizona women’s participation in local clubs and organizations. These women gathered together to promote charitable causes, support cultural programs, talk business, and meet up with other women for social and educational events. Below are some photographs and snippets about some of those organizations’ papers:

Buehman Photograph Collection

Beuhman – Places – Tucson – Organizations – National Woman’s Party; BN32103

Buehman – Places – Tucson – Organizations – National Woman’s Party; BN32103

This photograph, taken circa 1910, shows women of the National Woman’s Party in Tucson. The banner on the wall reads: “We Demand an Amendment to the United States Constitution Enfranchising Women.” (Buehman – Places – Tucson – Organizations – National Woman’s Party; BN32103. As always, if you see a photo on the blog that you like please contact us about reproduction options at ahsref@azhs.gov.)

MS 912
Tucson Woman’s Club Records, 1900 – 1957 (bulk 1932-1953)

The group was founded in 1900 and was dedicated to the “social and intellectual development of its members.” Contains minutes, yearbooks, and scrapbooks from the Tucson Woman’s Club; activities include art shows, fundraising efforts, educational groups, gardening clubs, music, needlework, and participation in the annual meeting of the Arizona Federation of Women. The club was very active in war work during the World War I and World War II.

League of Mexican American Women, Ephemera file

The League of Mexican American Women is a community action group founded in 1967, and their fundraising efforts go toward educational programs for youth in the community, including scholarships. One of their biggest events is the Fiesta en Xochimilco. The file contains articles and programs related to the group’s activities.

Buehman Photograph Collection

Beuhman – Places – Tucson – Organizations – IOOF- Naomi Rebekah Lodge; BN207609

Buehman – Places – Tucson – Organizations – IOOF- Naomi Rebekah Lodge; BN207609

These women were part of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows Naomi Rebekah Lodge. The Rebekahs are a fraternal order dedicated to community service. According to the information on the back of the photograph, this particular group traveled throughout Arizona establishing new lodges. Circa 1928. (Buehman – Places – Tucson – Organizations – IOOF- Naomi Rebekah Lodge; BN207609. As always, if you see a photo on the blog that you like please contact us about reproduction options at ahsref@azhs.gov.)

MS 632
Town and Gown Club minutes, 1924-1957

Minute books of the Town and Gown Club, which was originally formed as the “University and Town Women.” This group met to hear music, lectures, and poems presented by University of Arizona faculty or guest speakers, and discuss national and local current events.

MS 1163
Women’s Universal Benevolent Association membership ledger, 1895-1896

A ledger documenting members’ names and dues paid for the year. Officers for the year were listed as Mrs. J.A. Black, Mrs. S.H. Drachman, Mrs. A.V. Grossetta, and Mrs. J. Ferrin.

 

Arizona Women Pushing Boundaries

29 Mar
MS 1134: Torres Papers. This photo shows some ephemera collected by Tucson activist Alva Torres.

MS 1134: Torres Papers. This photo shows some ephemera collected by Tucson activist Alva Torres.

In honor of Women’s History Month, we want to call attention to some of our resources on amazing Arizona women. All of these collections and photographs and more are open for research.

The Torres Papers
MS 1134

Alva Bustamante Torres, a fourth-generation Tucsonan, is a community activist who served on a number of local boards and committees. She was particularly involved in Mexican-American organizations and historic preservation. Torres spearheaded the drive in the early 1970s to preserve La Plaza de la Mesilla in downtown Tucson at the time of massive urban renewal in that area. This collection includes correspondence, minutes, notes, invitations and programs, and newspaper clippings pertinent to the many organizations to which she belonged. The bulk of the collection covers the period 1969-1980 with the exception of materials pertaining to the Illegal Immigrant Amnesty program* in 1988.

*Today the preferred term would be undocumented immigrants, not “illegal.” This was an accepted word of the time.

The Neff Papers
MS 580

Mary Lawson Neff was the first neurologist and first female psychiatrist in Arizona. The materials in this collection consist of articles written by Neff, programs, clippings, and scrapbooks that Neff created about her work in medicine.

Phylena Wallace Tonge Papers
MS 1023

This collection consists of the handwritten reminiscences of Phylena Wallace Tonge. Tonge traveled on a wagon train from Iowa to California in 1848, and relocated to Tucson in 1862. She taught school in the area.

Lily Olivaras Valenzuela Liu Oral History
AV 00115

In this oral history interview, Liu discussed her work for the Southern Pacific Railroad during World War II, women in the workforce, and Mexican American and Chinese American customs.

Below are some of our favorite photographs of Tucson women.

Women involved in games at the Tucson rodeo.  Western Ways photograph collection, folder 410b.

Women involved in games at the Tucson rodeo. Western Ways photograph collection, folder 410b.

Photo number 62674 from the photo file Portrait-Huerta-Castro Family. This photograph is circa 1905.

Photo number 62674 from the photo file Portrait-Huerta-Castro Family. This photograph is circa 1905.

For more resources on Women’s History Month, see http://womenshistorymonth.gov/ and http://www.smithsonianmag.com/specialsections/womens-history/womens-history-month.html.