Tag Archives: weather

Photo Friday: Drink Man!

17 May

The hot weather of summer has officially arrived in Tucson as our first day of 2013 with triple digit temperatures is upon us. This naturally gets one wondering how earlier residents of the Old Pueblo managed to stay cool on scorching summer days. Well, this wonderful photo from our portrait files helps answer that very question! For this installment of Photo Friday I am sharing this wonderful image of a street beverage vendor with you. According to information included with the photograph, this image of Juan Velasquez was taken on the streets of Tucson in about 1901. He is seen posing with a small tray balanced on his head. The tray holds a bucket of ice and bottles of flavored syrup which he used for making “helados”, the flavored snow-cone like drinks he sold. Juanito (as he was known) walked through the Barrio Viejo of Tucson calling out “Helados!” and when customers appeared he would stop, chop up some ice and cover it with whatever fruit flavored syrup they selected. Strawberry and lemon are said to have been favorites. According to three 1973 articles in the Tucson Citizen about the “Drink Man” written by Don Schellie, customers had to provide their own glasses and the cost for one of these delicious helados was 5 cents. You can read these articles in our clip books (a series of biographical clippings collected by AHS staff about residents of southern Arizona)—just look under “Drink Man” to learn more. You can see the photograph by requesting photo file Portrait—Velasquez, Juan (#2052). As always, if you are interested in obtaining a copy of this photograph or permission to publish it, contact us at ahsref@azhs.gov. And the next time you just have to treat yourself to one of the many options for icy, fruit-flavored drinks available around town this summer, remember that you are carrying on a Tucson tradition! Stay cool!

Portrait--Velasquez, Juan_2052. If you are interested in obtaining a copy of this photograph or permission to publish it, contact us at ahsref@azhs.gov.

Portrait–Velasquez, Juan_2052. If you are interested in obtaining a copy of this photograph or permission to publish it, contact us at ahsref@azhs.gov.

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May Day

30 Apr

May Day, of course, is a celebration of the beginning of summer. It has roots in ancient celebrations, like the Celtic festival of Beltane, and is sometimes celebrated today with the May Pole Dance and the crowning of a May Queen, among other things.

Girls dancing the traditional Maypole Dance, taken at Davis School, circa 1905. Portraits-Peyron-Araneta Family, #62632. As always, if you’d like to purchase reproductions of any of our photographs, please contact us at ahsref@azhs.gov.

Girls dancing the traditional Maypole Dance, taken at Davis School, circa 1905. Portraits-Peyron-Araneta Family, #62632. As always, if you’d like to purchase reproductions of any of our photographs, please contact us at ahsref@azhs.gov.

However, libraries and archives have capitalized on the double meaning of May Day as a distress call (and the date’s convenient location at the end of Preservation Week), to use it as a day to raise awareness about disaster preparedness. In the archives we take all sorts of measures to ensure the longevity of our records – there are lots of things we are able to predict and expect: acid free enclosures slow deterioration of archival materials; maintaining stable environmental conditions helps protect archival materials. But we also have to be prepared for the unexpected – fire, flood, weather.  So for this year’s May Day we, along with archival institutions around the world, are taking extra steps to make sure we will be prepared in the face of a potential disaster.

At AHS-Tucson, we are observing May Day by:

-Checking the batteries in the flashlights we have placed strategically throughout the stacks in the event of a power outage.

-Continuing work on a larger scale project to create an emergency plan for all AHS Library and Archives locations

-Starting an emergency kit to be placed in the collections area.

 

Our brand new Emergency Kit!

Our brand new Emergency Kit!

Among other things, our emergency kit will include the following items:

-A copy of our emergency plan

-Plastic sheeting

-Forms for documenting recovery measures

-Pencils, clipboard

-First Aid kit

-Nitrile gloves

-Masks

Do you want to learn more about May Day and emergency plans for archives and archival collections?

The Northeast Document Conservation Center has lots of tools for creating a disaster plan and a suggested list of contents for an emergency kit.

These are just a few of the things we’re working on to ensure the safety and security of our collections. To learn more about May Day and emergency preparedness check out the SAA’s information on May Day activities and
the Council of State Archivists’ May Day information page.

Image

Snow Day in Tucson

20 Feb

It doesn’t usually snow in Tucson. Though the mountains around the city often get a dusting of the white stuff, the city itself is usually too low in altitude and too high in temperature to see anything but rain. However today we had a rather unexpected (as in, none of us really expected to see any snow), respectable snowfall. Even though nothing stuck, it was a real treat to see snow falling in the desert for a bit.

AHS employees peer out at the snow from the Reading Room.

AHS employees peer out at the snow from the Reading Room.

Museum courtyard studded with falling snowflakes.

Museum courtyard studded with falling snowflakes.

The view from the Reading Room window. A little fuzzy, but you get the idea.

The view from the Reading Room window. A little fuzzy, but you get the idea.