Tag Archives: University of Arizona

Nuestra Poesía: An Evening of Poetry with Alberto Ríos

1 Apr

Join us for an evening with Arizona Poet Laureate Alberto Ríos. Ríos will share some of his work and discuss the role that oral history plays in his writing. A native of Nogales, Arizona, Ríos writes about life along the U.S. and Mexico border, blending the personal with the political in a way that makes us see both in a new light.

Reception at 7pm followed by the reading at 7:30pm at the University of Arizona Poetry Center at Helen and Vine.

For more information and to RSVP, please contact the Arizona Historical Society Archives at: 520-617-1157 or ahsref@azhs.gov.

This event is a partnership between the Arizona Historical Society, the University of Arizona College of Humanities, the Spanish and Portuguese Department, and the Gender and Women’s Studies Department, and the last event of the Nuestro Tucson: The Move Towards Latina/o Civil Rights series.

This event and all the events in the Nuestro Tucson series are made possible through a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association.

NuestraPoesiaflyer

 

 

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Dark Sky Week

22 Apr

It’s Earth Day – a great time to think about how we can be better stewards of the planet. But it’s not just Earth Day – this week is also International Dark Sky Week. Tucson has been on the forefront of the responsible lighting movement for many years. With Tucson’s population expanding in the mid 20th century and an increased reliance on street lights and other outdoor lighting, the many observatories and astronomy institutions in the area were in danger of being put out of business. Light pollution was threatening to obscure faint objects in space. Tucson and Pima County enacted laws in the 1970s and 1980s to make sure proper light bulbs were used and that lights were directed down where the light is needed instead of polluting the sky. One of the first things I noticed when I moved to Tucson was how dark it is here at night – so it was very interesting to discover the history behind the dark nights and the beautiful stars that can be enjoyed around town even without a telescope! In honor of Dark Sky Week, here is a photo taken from the Steward Observatory:

Trifid Nebula taken from the Steward Observatory in Tucson in May 1970. PC214f159_G. As always, if you'd like to use an image from this blog, please contact us at ahsref@azhs.gov for permissions.

Trifid Nebula taken from the Steward Observatory in Tucson in May 1970. PC214f159_G. As always, if you’d like to use an image from this blog, please contact us at ahsref@azhs.gov for permissions.

First Photos & the Looming End of Summer

1 Aug
From one of our Western Ways Collections, MS 1255, Box 19, Folder 276, Photograph E. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

From one of our Western Ways Manuscript Collections, MS 1255, Box 19, Folder 276, Photograph E. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

I feel that this is true of most (all?) archivists: at one point or another something magnificent in their collections jumps out at them and they never forget it. Of course, I’m lucky enough to work in a place where I’m astounded by the collections every single day. But I do remember the first photo that caught my eye when I started working here, and that is the photo above. I now have no recollection of what we had pulled the box and folder for, but I found a slip of paper on my desk yesterday that said: “Remember MS 1255, Box 19, Folder 276, Photo E.” I left myself that note so I would always remember this photo. Now I’m sharing this photo with all of you so you can enjoy it as well! And there is no moment more appropriate than today, as August is upon us and with it the end of summer, the return of students to the University of Arizona and a pick-up in users coming into the Reading Room. The information on the back of this photo reads: “Women guests at Hotel Playa de Cortes on the Gulf of California, at Guaymas, Sonora have to entertain themselves during the day, even resorting to leapfrog on the beach. The men are out on Tom Jamison’s sports fishing cruisers, after sailfish and marlin and dolphin, now in season.” The women in this photo are identified as Barbara Black, Joan Hugg, and Mary Kaster.

So please, enjoy your last bits of summer Tucson! Soon enough school will be starting up and things will be hoppin’ around the Old Pueblo again!

Clubbing

26 Apr

Women’s History Month is over, but women’s history isn’t! In that spirit, we have pulled together some of AHS-Tucson’s collections that document Arizona women’s participation in local clubs and organizations. These women gathered together to promote charitable causes, support cultural programs, talk business, and meet up with other women for social and educational events. Below are some photographs and snippets about some of those organizations’ papers:

Buehman Photograph Collection

Beuhman – Places – Tucson – Organizations – National Woman’s Party; BN32103

Buehman – Places – Tucson – Organizations – National Woman’s Party; BN32103

This photograph, taken circa 1910, shows women of the National Woman’s Party in Tucson. The banner on the wall reads: “We Demand an Amendment to the United States Constitution Enfranchising Women.” (Buehman – Places – Tucson – Organizations – National Woman’s Party; BN32103. As always, if you see a photo on the blog that you like please contact us about reproduction options at ahsref@azhs.gov.)

MS 912
Tucson Woman’s Club Records, 1900 – 1957 (bulk 1932-1953)

The group was founded in 1900 and was dedicated to the “social and intellectual development of its members.” Contains minutes, yearbooks, and scrapbooks from the Tucson Woman’s Club; activities include art shows, fundraising efforts, educational groups, gardening clubs, music, needlework, and participation in the annual meeting of the Arizona Federation of Women. The club was very active in war work during the World War I and World War II.

League of Mexican American Women, Ephemera file

The League of Mexican American Women is a community action group founded in 1967, and their fundraising efforts go toward educational programs for youth in the community, including scholarships. One of their biggest events is the Fiesta en Xochimilco. The file contains articles and programs related to the group’s activities.

Buehman Photograph Collection

Beuhman – Places – Tucson – Organizations – IOOF- Naomi Rebekah Lodge; BN207609

Buehman – Places – Tucson – Organizations – IOOF- Naomi Rebekah Lodge; BN207609

These women were part of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows Naomi Rebekah Lodge. The Rebekahs are a fraternal order dedicated to community service. According to the information on the back of the photograph, this particular group traveled throughout Arizona establishing new lodges. Circa 1928. (Buehman – Places – Tucson – Organizations – IOOF- Naomi Rebekah Lodge; BN207609. As always, if you see a photo on the blog that you like please contact us about reproduction options at ahsref@azhs.gov.)

MS 632
Town and Gown Club minutes, 1924-1957

Minute books of the Town and Gown Club, which was originally formed as the “University and Town Women.” This group met to hear music, lectures, and poems presented by University of Arizona faculty or guest speakers, and discuss national and local current events.

MS 1163
Women’s Universal Benevolent Association membership ledger, 1895-1896

A ledger documenting members’ names and dues paid for the year. Officers for the year were listed as Mrs. J.A. Black, Mrs. S.H. Drachman, Mrs. A.V. Grossetta, and Mrs. J. Ferrin.

 

Taking Notes: Nancy Godoy’s Guest Lecture on “Collecting Archival Materials from Mexican Communities”

19 Mar
A photograph from the Mexican Heritage Project. To find this photograph, ask for: #63527 in Picture-Transportation-Railroad-Personnel-1a.Identified in the photo are: Celia Morelos Pain, Brijida Vasquez, Rebeca Andrade (also identified as Rosa Sonoqui, by aquaintance), Ramona Herran Robles, and Juana Lujan.

A photograph from the Mexican Heritage Project. To look at this photograph here at AHS, ask for: #63527 in Picture-Transportation-Railroad-Personnel-1a.
Identified in the photo are: Celia Morelos Pain, Brijida Vasquez, Rebeca Andrade (also identified as Rosa Sonoqui, by acquaintance), Ramona Herran Robles, and Juana Lujan.

As a student in the School of Information Resources and Library Science and a Knowledge River Graduate Assistant here at the Arizona Historical Society, it is inspiring for me to see a former student of both succeed. On Friday March 1st archivist Erin Wahl and I attended a presentation put on by the Society of American Archivists University of Arizona chapter who brought the curator/librarian from the Chicano/a Research Collection at Arizona State University (ASU), Nancy Liliana Godoy to conduct a workshop called “Collecting Archival Material from Mexican Communities.” Godoy, a Knowledge River Scholar and former Graduate Assistant at AHS, presented on the importance of outreach to under-represented communities via non-traditional methods, like Facebook, Twitter, and other technology. Additionally, Godoy has utilized Facebook as an avenue to introduce Chicano/a Research Collection materials to younger audiences. She emphasized the need for archivists to actively be a part of and advocate for the community they serve.

The work that Godoy does at the Chicano/a Research Collection is similar to the efforts made through the Mexican Heritage Project at the Arizona Historical Society. In the 1980s, Patricia Preciado Martin and Thomas E. Sheridan announced a call to action for people in the Arizona community to bring forth photographs of Mexican Americans in Arizona. These four-thousand-plus images include family portraits, businesses, organizations, traditions, celebrations, and much more. The grassroots project did and still does work to document the Mexican American communities of Tucson during the turn of the century from the 1870s-1940s. This term, my graduate assistantship includes making progress towards developing the Mexican Heritage Project further. This progress currently involves the digitization of these images gathered for the Mexican Heritage Project, which will be exhibited as part of the Arizona Historical Society’s contribution to the Arizona Memory Project.