Tag Archives: students

Student Tours

24 Jun

One of our favorite things to do is have high school students come into the archives and try out archival research! These students investigated topics on mining in Arizona and found some great material on the Bisbee Deportation, mining ghost towns, and the Greenways. We were thrilled to have them visit!

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upec

 

First Photos & the Looming End of Summer

1 Aug
From one of our Western Ways Collections, MS 1255, Box 19, Folder 276, Photograph E. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

From one of our Western Ways Manuscript Collections, MS 1255, Box 19, Folder 276, Photograph E. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

I feel that this is true of most (all?) archivists: at one point or another something magnificent in their collections jumps out at them and they never forget it. Of course, I’m lucky enough to work in a place where I’m astounded by the collections every single day. But I do remember the first photo that caught my eye when I started working here, and that is the photo above. I now have no recollection of what we had pulled the box and folder for, but I found a slip of paper on my desk yesterday that said: “Remember MS 1255, Box 19, Folder 276, Photo E.” I left myself that note so I would always remember this photo. Now I’m sharing this photo with all of you so you can enjoy it as well! And there is no moment more appropriate than today, as August is upon us and with it the end of summer, the return of students to the University of Arizona and a pick-up in users coming into the Reading Room. The information on the back of this photo reads: “Women guests at Hotel Playa de Cortes on the Gulf of California, at Guaymas, Sonora have to entertain themselves during the day, even resorting to leapfrog on the beach. The men are out on Tom Jamison’s sports fishing cruisers, after sailfish and marlin and dolphin, now in season.” The women in this photo are identified as Barbara Black, Joan Hugg, and Mary Kaster.

So please, enjoy your last bits of summer Tucson! Soon enough school will be starting up and things will be hoppin’ around the Old Pueblo again!

Oh Deer…

23 Jul
This photo is called "Buck Bait" and appears in the Esther Henderson Photo Collection: PC 175-B1-F26-D.  As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

This photo is called “Buck Bait” and appears in the Esther Henderson Photo Collection: PC 175-B1-F26-D. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

The Arizona Historical Society Library and Archives would like to alert our users that we will be closing early this Wednesday, July 24, 2013 at 2:00pm. We are excited to welcome the University of Arizona’s School of Information Resources and Library Science (SIRLS) summer class on Preservation to tour the Library and Archives and talk about issues in preservation with representatives from AHS, the Arizona State Archives and the SIRLS instructor and Preservation Librarian at the University of Utah’s Marriott Library.  We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause. In the meantime, please enjoy this lovely photo of a deer.

Photo Friday: Fortune Tellers & Student Performers

22 Mar
While assisting a patron with a research request yesterday, I came across a fascinating historical tidbit in an ephemera file (Places—Arizona– Tucson—history—1880s–general). According to an article published in the Arizona Daily Star (January 15, 1979) by Betty Beard, the most expensive business license fees in 1880s Tucson were charged not to proprietors of saloons, trolley car drivers or dry goods merchants, but rather to astrologers, seers, fortune tellers and clairvoyants, who were charged a total of $50 every three months! While it’s hard to say just how many fortune tellers called Tucson home in the 1880s, I did find this wonderful photo of a group of students dressed up as such for a circa 1895 production of “Gypsy” at Safford School.  (AHS #40587 from photo file Portrait—Ronstadt, Frederick). The students are identified as top row: Sofía Levin and José M. Ronstadt. Middle row: Lupe Dalton Ronstadt, Hortensia Dalton Ronstadt and Louisa Baffert. Bottom row: Frecia Montoya Lippincott and Lilly Goodwin. This photo is the first installment of our new blog series “Photo Friday” where we will be periodically sharing a sampling of interesting images from our collection of nearly one million historic photographs. While we can’t predict the future, we hope you will find these photos as intriguing and enchanting as we do!
AHS #40587 from photo file Portrait—Ronstadt, Frederick

AHS #40587 from photo file Portrait—Ronstadt, Frederick

National History Day

11 Mar

On March 2nd I participated in my first National History Day. NHD is a nationwide program that encourages primary and secondary students to research topics in history according to a specific theme and present their projects in competition. Students pick a topic, research it, and create an exhibit, a documentary, a performance, or write an original paper. Although the Regional Competition was held at the University of Arizona in early March, the students’ work began last fall when they first came into the archives with a broad subject and archivists helped them determine their first research steps. Those projects that began in the archives in September culminated this month at the regional competition. Students came dressed in business clothes with projects in hand, and the eagerness and excitement amongst them was palpable. It was so gratifying to see kids so enthusiastic about a history competition! I heard original paper presentations, and the work and the creativity that went into the projects was impressive.

The theme this year was Turning Points in History, so students studied various events and argued that those events dramatically affected the course of history. Students who advanced in the regional competition will go on to compete at the state level in Phoenix in April. The final nationwide competition takes place in June in Washington, D.C.

An article featuring a past National History Day from the ephemera file on the Arizona Historical Society.

An article featuring a past National History Day from the ephemera file on the Arizona Historical Society.

NHD is a wonderful opportunity to expose young people to the archives. As easy as it can be to find information online, this is a good reminder for some – and first exposure for others – that there are also great resources at their fingertips in the local archives. Students learn the difference between primary and secondary sources and are required to utilize primary documents in their projects. In addition to learning about research methods, students also develop writing, public speaking, and critical thinking skills.
I’m already looking forward to September when a new batch of students come into our library and archives to start their projects for next year’s competition!
If you’re interested in learning more about National History Day, or want to know how you can get involved in your local competition, visit the National History Day website.