Tag Archives: photo

Happy New Year: 2014

2 Jan

Today the Arizona Historical Society Library & Archives is open once again after our holiday closures. 2014 is here and looking good already. We’ve been talking about resolutions around the library these days. Whether or not you make New Years resolutions, the end of the past year and the beginning of a new one is a good time to reflect on your personal goals. Although having big things to aspire to can be a great challenge, it’s also a good idea to make a few small, yet equally important resolutions that you are confident you can accomplish. You may never get to the gym again after January 24th, but maybe you CAN organize your garage, or identify and instigate better eating habits, or read the book you’ve got on your coffee table, or go on vacation and catch a big fish like the gal in the photograph below. Better yet, create some family goals that you can all work on together throughout the year. Whether it’s sitting down all together once a week for dinner or games, or making a promise not to leave your shoes in the middle of the kitchen where dad always trips over them, having family goals and the support to follow through on them can be helpful as well as bring the whole family together.

As a special new year treat, the Arizona Historical Society Library & Archives in Tucson will be open this Saturday, January 4th, 2014 from 10am-1pm by appointment only. If you would like to come in to do some research this Saturday please contact us directly via email: ahsref@azhs.gov and let us know when you’re coming during those hours and what you want to look at. Appointments can be made up till 4pm on Friday afternoon. You need to have an appointment and tell us what you want to look at to research on Saturday.

As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

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Happy Christmas!

26 Dec

The Library and Archives might be closed today, but we thought we’d take a moment to create a special Christmas week post for all of our patrons who celebrate this holiday. We hope that everyone is having a good time with friends and family this holiday season as well as eating a ton of yummy goodies before the New Year and its inevitable weight-loss resolutions arrive.

The photo we’re sharing today is from our Photo Files. The notes on this photo say that this is a photo of the winning house from Jaycees’ first Annual Christmas Home Decoration Contest. This is the home of Mr. and Mrs. George Glen Cooper, located 1215 East Indio Street. This photo was taken on Christmas Eve as the homeowners were receiving their prize. The people pictured are (from left to right): Hurlstone Fairchild and Esther Henderson, both judges. Then Mr. Cooper and Mrs. Edith Cooper, the homeowners. Then Mrs. Lilly Merritt Starkweather and Professor Pete Anderson, both judges.

PC 1000-Places-Tucson-Homes-C-#7715. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

PC 1000-Places-Tucson-Homes-C-#7715. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

This photo made us think of the Christmas decoration traditions we each have in our homes. Erin’s grandmother hides a pickle ornament in the Christmas tree and gives an extra present to the person who finds it first on Christmas Day. Her mother also puts a rubber octopus on the tree, a remnant from the days when it was the only thing keep the kids from touching and breaking all the ornaments. Caitlin’s most notable decoration tradition is the constant battle in their house between colored lights or white lights on the Christmas tree.

Does your family have any decoration traditions? Or just family-specific traditions in general? Archivists know it’s never too early to start documenting things. Grab some paper, pencils and crayons and have your kids write out their favorite family traditions–with illustrations, of course! Then use a hole-punch and yarn to “bind” them together into a fun little book. You can add to it every year and keep it on the coffee table during Christmas as your own holiday family history.

Photo Friday: Fortune Tellers & Student Performers

22 Mar
While assisting a patron with a research request yesterday, I came across a fascinating historical tidbit in an ephemera file (Places—Arizona– Tucson—history—1880s–general). According to an article published in the Arizona Daily Star (January 15, 1979) by Betty Beard, the most expensive business license fees in 1880s Tucson were charged not to proprietors of saloons, trolley car drivers or dry goods merchants, but rather to astrologers, seers, fortune tellers and clairvoyants, who were charged a total of $50 every three months! While it’s hard to say just how many fortune tellers called Tucson home in the 1880s, I did find this wonderful photo of a group of students dressed up as such for a circa 1895 production of “Gypsy” at Safford School.  (AHS #40587 from photo file Portrait—Ronstadt, Frederick). The students are identified as top row: Sofía Levin and José M. Ronstadt. Middle row: Lupe Dalton Ronstadt, Hortensia Dalton Ronstadt and Louisa Baffert. Bottom row: Frecia Montoya Lippincott and Lilly Goodwin. This photo is the first installment of our new blog series “Photo Friday” where we will be periodically sharing a sampling of interesting images from our collection of nearly one million historic photographs. While we can’t predict the future, we hope you will find these photos as intriguing and enchanting as we do!
AHS #40587 from photo file Portrait—Ronstadt, Frederick

AHS #40587 from photo file Portrait—Ronstadt, Frederick