Tag Archives: memory

Happy Christmas!

26 Dec

The Library and Archives might be closed today, but we thought we’d take a moment to create a special Christmas week post for all of our patrons who celebrate this holiday. We hope that everyone is having a good time with friends and family this holiday season as well as eating a ton of yummy goodies before the New Year and its inevitable weight-loss resolutions arrive.

The photo we’re sharing today is from our Photo Files. The notes on this photo say that this is a photo of the winning house from Jaycees’ first Annual Christmas Home Decoration Contest. This is the home of Mr. and Mrs. George Glen Cooper, located 1215 East Indio Street. This photo was taken on Christmas Eve as the homeowners were receiving their prize. The people pictured are (from left to right): Hurlstone Fairchild and Esther Henderson, both judges. Then Mr. Cooper and Mrs. Edith Cooper, the homeowners. Then Mrs. Lilly Merritt Starkweather and Professor Pete Anderson, both judges.

PC 1000-Places-Tucson-Homes-C-#7715. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

PC 1000-Places-Tucson-Homes-C-#7715. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

This photo made us think of the Christmas decoration traditions we each have in our homes. Erin’s grandmother hides a pickle ornament in the Christmas tree and gives an extra present to the person who finds it first on Christmas Day. Her mother also puts a rubber octopus on the tree, a remnant from the days when it was the only thing keep the kids from touching and breaking all the ornaments. Caitlin’s most notable decoration tradition is the constant battle in their house between colored lights or white lights on the Christmas tree.

Does your family have any decoration traditions? Or just family-specific traditions in general? Archivists know it’s never too early to start documenting things. Grab some paper, pencils and crayons and have your kids write out their favorite family traditions–with illustrations, of course! Then use a hole-punch and yarn to “bind” them together into a fun little book. You can add to it every year and keep it on the coffee table during Christmas as your own holiday family history.

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Photo Friday: One Gila of a Workout

16 Aug

It’s not easy being a Gila Monster.

Buehman-Subjects-Animals-BN205186. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

Buehman-Subjects-Animals-BN205186. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

 

This photo from the Arizona Historical Society’s Buehman photograph collection, catches a Gila Monster in a gem of a moment, trying to keep his balance and stay on this long pole. Is he doing pull-ups or trying out for the next Olympic gymnastics team? The Gila Monster is particularly special to the Southwest as it is native to this region. It seems that more than a few Tucsonans have a good Gila Monster story.

It’s hard to imagine a lizard more suited to good stories than a Gila Monster. They just seem destined for fiction, and they appear in it often. One of my beloved books as a kid in Ohio was “Gila Monsters Meet you at the Airport” by Marjorie Weinman Sharmat (which we do happen to have here in the archives and which can also probably be found at your local library). This book was also once featured on the television program “Reading Rainbow,” for those of you who want to get a little nostalgic for good PBS programs encouraging reading.

Monsoon season is a prime moment to catch elusive animals like the Gila Monster out in the open enjoying the wave of cool and lovely puddles after the rain. It’s a good moment to take advantage of if you have kids. Take them on a special creative hike. Bring some paper and pens or crayons along and something sturdy to write on. When they see something neat let them stop and write about the experience or take a few minutes to draw what they see. You may not make swift progress up a hill, but you will get some good drawings or writing to put on your fridge and your kids will have something fun to talk about when they return to school. And just because you don’t have kids doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy the same kind of activity. Take some colored pencils with you on your next hike. Take some paper and a pen. Write things down. Sketch. You may find yourself having more fun than you first imagined. And you may find yourself face to face with a Gila Monster.

First Photos & the Looming End of Summer

1 Aug
From one of our Western Ways Collections, MS 1255, Box 19, Folder 276, Photograph E. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

From one of our Western Ways Manuscript Collections, MS 1255, Box 19, Folder 276, Photograph E. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

I feel that this is true of most (all?) archivists: at one point or another something magnificent in their collections jumps out at them and they never forget it. Of course, I’m lucky enough to work in a place where I’m astounded by the collections every single day. But I do remember the first photo that caught my eye when I started working here, and that is the photo above. I now have no recollection of what we had pulled the box and folder for, but I found a slip of paper on my desk yesterday that said: “Remember MS 1255, Box 19, Folder 276, Photo E.” I left myself that note so I would always remember this photo. Now I’m sharing this photo with all of you so you can enjoy it as well! And there is no moment more appropriate than today, as August is upon us and with it the end of summer, the return of students to the University of Arizona and a pick-up in users coming into the Reading Room. The information on the back of this photo reads: “Women guests at Hotel Playa de Cortes on the Gulf of California, at Guaymas, Sonora have to entertain themselves during the day, even resorting to leapfrog on the beach. The men are out on Tom Jamison’s sports fishing cruisers, after sailfish and marlin and dolphin, now in season.” The women in this photo are identified as Barbara Black, Joan Hugg, and Mary Kaster.

So please, enjoy your last bits of summer Tucson! Soon enough school will be starting up and things will be hoppin’ around the Old Pueblo again!

Memorial Day

27 May

Today is Memorial Day and all across the USA families and friends are getting together to wave small flags at parades, bbq a ton of meat, and remember the men and women who served our country in the United States Armed Forces and died doing their duty.

Memorial Day is different from Veterans Day, though many people get them mixed up. Memorial Day was specifically started to remember those who died in the Armed Forces, while Veterans Day celebrates those living and dead. However contemporary celebrations often involve expressing thanks to currently serving and surviving troops in addition to those who passed away in the line of duty.

While you’re eating your hamburgers, potato salad and grilled veggies today, take a minute to talk to your kids about why we celebrate holidays like Memorial Day. War always causes opinions and perspectives to swirl on many sides, and our armed forces tend to get caught up in the middle of things. Rather than focusing on the politics of war, talk to your kids about the history behind the USA Armed Forces. If you have ancestors who served in wars, bring out photos or documents kept by your family to help connect your family history with the history of our country. Memorial Day is a great opportunity to connect children with their own family history and how it relates to the broader scope of US history.

In observance of Memorial Day, the Library & Archives will be closed all day today, Monday May 27, 2013. Don’t worry…we’ll be open again tomorrow!

PC 1000- Subjects-Wars-World War II (Part 2)-W.A.A.C.

PC 1000- Subjects-Wars-World War II (Part 2)-W.A.A.C.