Tag Archives: maps

Where is it Wednesday?

6 May

What Arizona city is portrayed in this section of a map from the Robert Lenon Collection?

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Check our Facebook page tomorrow for the answer!

Where is it Wednesday?

29 Apr

Does anyone know what Arizona location is depicted in this portion of a map from the Robert Lenon Collection? Hint: The map is from 1916!

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Please check out our Facebook tomorrow for the answer!

Map Musings: Unveiling the Lenon Collection

13 Dec

In early December the Library and Archives welcomed what may be the single largest archival collection to be acquired in at least 50 years – and perhaps in the history of the archives! We are excited to announce the newest collection at the Arizona Historical Society: The Robert Lenon Map Collection! This collection will be an amazing resource for people interested in mining and minerals, geography, family and property history, and Arizona history as a whole. We will post periodically about this new addition, including our adventures in transporting a 600-cubic-foot map collection from Patagonia to the Arizona Historical Society in Tucson, so keep an eye out here for more information!

 Part of the Robert Lenon Map Collection in its new home at AHS-Tucson. It’s in full view in one of our galleries, so if you come by the museum you will get to see it in person and watch the progress as we begin to process it!

Part of the Robert Lenon Map Collection in its new home at AHS-Tucson. It’s in full view in one of our galleries, so if you come by the museum you will get to see it in person and watch the progress as we begin to process it!

Columbus Day

14 Oct
As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

Detail of one of our larger world maps. To view this map, come into the archives during our open hours and ask for: G3290 1586 A4 198u MAP. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

Today is Columbus Day which means the Arizona Historical Society Library and Archives in Tucson is closed.

The map above is not ancient. It was printed sometime in the 1980s. It is, however, a copy of a much older map. Making prints of old maps is quite common. Cartography was, and in many ways still is, an art form. Making maps in those long ago times meant having a sense of style and a flair for illustration. Take a closer look at this picture, or come in and view the map in person. There are some amazing creatures pictured on the map above and the side illustration and portraits are done with great attention to detail. These details are what makes these maps, and prints of them, so popular even today. This one is particularly interesting when you take the time to compare the shape of the continents to the much more accurate maps of today. Map making is definitely an art and with an ever-growing collection of over 4,000 maps we see a lot of the cartographic arts here at the Historical Society!

If your kids have the day off school today, why not take a page from the great old cartographers? Make a map! Supply paper and coloring utensils and let the kids make a map of the house or the yard. Steep some tea bags for 30 seconds to a minute and then remove them from the hot water and drag them along the finished maps. This will stain the paper and give them an authentic treasure map look. Make sure to let them dry fully before handling again. You could even give each person a “treasure” (like a candy bar or small toy) to hide and then have them draw a map to it. When everyone’s finished, switch maps and go looking for buried treasure. Bonus points if you’re all wearing pirate eye patches!

Eagle-Picher Mining Maps

4 Oct

The kids are back in school, the last of the summer days are winding down and we can all see cooler weather not so far ahead, but here at the Arizona Historical Society we haven’t slowed down one bit!  We continue to answer your research needs as well as continuing our work on collections behind the scenes. Recently I completed one of the smaller series in my Montana Mine collection. This was a series containing maps and drawings. I didn’t have much to put in this series. There were only around 10 folders of maps in the entire collection, but they were quite striking. They’re all hand drawn and colored on a typical lined paper. They show different levels of the mine and although I’m not a mining expert myself, you don’t have to be one to enjoy how beautiful these are.

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MS 1473, Montana Mine Collection, Series 5. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

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MS 1473, Montana Mine Collection, Series 5. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.