Tag Archives: Manuscript Collection

Closures – Thanksgiving Holiday

25 Nov

We hope you have a very special holiday with loved ones, and delicious food.

Here are some turkeys for your enjoyment.

Turkey_47081

This photograph is of Karl F. Barfield, and his turkeys at the Barfield Sanitorium. Karl raised his own turkeys, and he served his guests and patients right on his property on east Speedway. Photo Identifier: PC 1000 – Portrait – Barfield, Karl F. #47081

We will be closed for the Thanksgiving Holiday on Thursday, November 27, 2014 & Friday November 28, 2014. We will reopen on Monday December 1, 2014 to our regular business hours of Monday – Friday 9am-4pm. We apologize for the incovenience, and please feel free to contact us at ahsref@azhs.gov or 520 – 617- 1157 if you have any questions.

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Thanksgiving

28 Nov

Today is Thanksgiving and the archives is closed in observance, both today Thursday, November 28 and tomorrow Friday, November 29. Today we’re sharing a fun find from one of our manuscript collections, MS 1183 Ronstadt Family Postcard Correspondence. Archivist Caitlin Lampman chose this particular postcard because of the adorable turkey border that surrounds the picture.  The archivists here at AHS hope that your Thanksgiving meal was as abundant and delicious as the pile of veggies this card shows and full of moments to reflect on the things you are glad to have. 

MS1183, Ronstadt Family Postcard Collection, Folder 17, #N.

MS1183, Ronstadt Family Postcard Collection, Folder 17, #N. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

Eagle-Picher Mining Maps

4 Oct

The kids are back in school, the last of the summer days are winding down and we can all see cooler weather not so far ahead, but here at the Arizona Historical Society we haven’t slowed down one bit!  We continue to answer your research needs as well as continuing our work on collections behind the scenes. Recently I completed one of the smaller series in my Montana Mine collection. This was a series containing maps and drawings. I didn’t have much to put in this series. There were only around 10 folders of maps in the entire collection, but they were quite striking. They’re all hand drawn and colored on a typical lined paper. They show different levels of the mine and although I’m not a mining expert myself, you don’t have to be one to enjoy how beautiful these are.

Something goes here.

MS 1473, Montana Mine Collection, Series 5. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

Something else goes here

MS 1473, Montana Mine Collection, Series 5. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

Samuel R. Lopez Collection

27 Sep

In historical archives, most collections are personal papers, belonging to members of the community that the archive serves. The specificity of some of these collections is what makes them so much fun to examine, and so important to researchers who come to find information!

The Samuel R. Lopez collection contains the personal papers of Samuel Lopez, who grew up in Tucson in the 1920s. While there are no photographs or correspondence, what this collection gives us are documents related to plays put on by the church youth group in the 20s and 30s called “The Little Flower Club.” This club, organized to pay tribute to Saint Therese of Lisieux, was active from 1926 to the mid 1950s, and this collection has scripts, songs, and prayer cards and catechisms with devotionals to Saint Therese.

Every time I process a collection I’m a little stunned by the insight into another person’s life I get. In this case, a portrait of Mr. Lopez was pretty clear: he was obviously a very religious man, who loved to entertain others. But the plays and prayers also give us a clear image of what the Catholic Church was like in the 1920s, and what kinds of prayers were in vogue at the time, and what this club was doing for the community.

The Samuel R. Lopez collection is available to researchers in our Reading Room and is only one of the collections that give a great slice-of-life perspective of Tucson and some of the lesser-known historical niches of this great city. If you have any interest in the history of the church or theater in Tucson, come check it out!

MS 1477, Samuel R. Lopez Collection, Box 1, Folder 1. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

MS 1477, Samuel R. Lopez Collection, Box 1, Folder 1. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

First Photos & the Looming End of Summer

1 Aug
From one of our Western Ways Collections, MS 1255, Box 19, Folder 276, Photograph E. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

From one of our Western Ways Manuscript Collections, MS 1255, Box 19, Folder 276, Photograph E. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

I feel that this is true of most (all?) archivists: at one point or another something magnificent in their collections jumps out at them and they never forget it. Of course, I’m lucky enough to work in a place where I’m astounded by the collections every single day. But I do remember the first photo that caught my eye when I started working here, and that is the photo above. I now have no recollection of what we had pulled the box and folder for, but I found a slip of paper on my desk yesterday that said: “Remember MS 1255, Box 19, Folder 276, Photo E.” I left myself that note so I would always remember this photo. Now I’m sharing this photo with all of you so you can enjoy it as well! And there is no moment more appropriate than today, as August is upon us and with it the end of summer, the return of students to the University of Arizona and a pick-up in users coming into the Reading Room. The information on the back of this photo reads: “Women guests at Hotel Playa de Cortes on the Gulf of California, at Guaymas, Sonora have to entertain themselves during the day, even resorting to leapfrog on the beach. The men are out on Tom Jamison’s sports fishing cruisers, after sailfish and marlin and dolphin, now in season.” The women in this photo are identified as Barbara Black, Joan Hugg, and Mary Kaster.

So please, enjoy your last bits of summer Tucson! Soon enough school will be starting up and things will be hoppin’ around the Old Pueblo again!