Tag Archives: library

Fun Friday: Happy Birthday, Linda Ronstadt!

17 Jul

Beloved Tucson native and rock goddess Linda Ronstadt turned 69 years old this week (July 15th)! To celebrate we’re sharing this concert poster from our collection, which promotes a 1968 performance at Palo Verde High by the musician and her Baroque pop band, The Stone Poneys.

 

The poster’s psychedelic design features a beautiful, stylized portrait of the birthday girl herself, and you can purchase your very own digital copy from the AHS Library and Archives. A digital scan of this or any other selected poster is $29. Scans of selected maps are also available for $35. Stop by the reading room to peruse all the posters we have for sale.*

We are open Monday through Friday, 9am-4pm. You may also contact the library at ahsref@azhs.gov or (520) 617-1157, if you’re interested or have any questions.

*Scans are for personal use only, not for publication

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New Library Catalog!

24 Sep

We are excited to announce that this month the AHS Archives is unveiling a new state-wide catalog. We are making the move to an open-source catalog that will be more efficient and more versatile than our previous system. We hope this new catalog will improve ease of access to our collections. If you have questions during the transition, please don’t hesitate to contact us and we will help!

To start browsing the new catalog, visit: http://catalog.azhsarchives.org/

New AHS catalog!  catalog.azhsarchives.org

                New AHS catalog!
         catalog.azhsarchives.org

New Exhibits: Arizona Historical Society Celebrates 150 Years!

8 Sep

The Arizona Historical Society is celebrating its sesquicentennial this year, and there are some great pieces commemorating those one hundred and fifty years of collecting and preserving Arizona’s past on display at the Arizona History Museum in Tucson. The Arizona 150 exhibit showcases some of the staff member’s favorite 150 items ever collected by AHS and includes works of art, clothing, photographs, and objects from Arizona’s rich history.

This brand certificate from the Burruel family papers (MS 1143) is featured in the AHS 150 exhibit and celebrates Arizona's ranching roots. If you'd like a copy of this image, please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for permissions.

This brand certificate from the Burruel family papers (MS 1143) is featured in the AHS 150 exhibit and celebrates Arizona’s ranching roots. If you’d like a copy of this image, please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for permissions.

The Library and Archives in Tucson has recently opened a new exhibit in the reading room with highlights from the Society’s 150-year history, including photographs of the first AHS buildings, founding members, and ephemera from a century and a half of celebrating Arizona’s history through events, exhibits, the Arizona History Convention, and many other unique traditions. Please come down and celebrate the Arizona Historical Society’s 150th birthday by checking out these great exhibits! 

 

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Announcements and Closures

13 Aug

We hope everyone’s having a great summer! We have a few announcements regarding visiting the archives in the near future (since we know announcements can be boring, we’ve illustrated the announcements with photos from our collection!)

First of all – it’s cold in here! I know it’s a hot summer out there in Tucson, but the Reading Room is a steady 60 degrees so if you’re coming in to do research please dress accordingly!

It feels like this outside:

The swimming pool at the Arizona Inn in the late 1930s. Buehman Photograph Collection, BN27219. As always, if you would like to use any photos on this blog, please contact us at ahsref@azhs.gov for permissions.

The swimming pool at the Arizona Inn in the late 1930s. Buehman Photograph Collection, BN27219. As always, if you would like to use any photos on this blog, please contact us at ahsref@azhs.gov for permissions.

But dress for this inside:

Snow covering the cacti at an unidentified home. Buehman Photograph Collection, BN207387. If you'd like to use any photos on this blog, please contact us at ahsref@azhs.gov for permissions.

Snow covering the cacti at an unidentified home. Buehman Photograph Collection, BN207387. If you’d like to use any photos on this blog, please contact us at ahsref@azhs.gov for permissions.

Closures: We are also going to have a few changes to our schedules in the next two months. During the week of August 25th through 29th we WILL ONLY BE OPEN FROM 1:30pm to 4pm. This is because we are in the midst of migrating our catalog and need the time in the morning to do crucial work on that project.

Home library from an album belonging to Fred W. Brown. Main Photograph Collection, 60670. If you'd like to use any photos from this blog, please contact us at ahsref@azhs.gov for permissions.

Home library from an album belonging to Fred W. Brown. Main Photograph Collection, 60670. If you’d like to use any photos from this blog, please contact us at ahsref@azhs.gov for permissions.

We will also be CLOSED from September 17th through September 19th to attend a workshop on preserving A/V materials which will be a great help to us in planning for the continued preservation of hundreds of feet of audiovisual material!

Unidentified woman at the KVOA radio station in Tucson, surrounded by wax cylinder audio recordings. Buehman Photograph Collection, B93071. If you'd like to use any photos on this blog, please contact us at ahsref@azhs.gov for permissions.

Unidentified woman at the KVOA radio station in Tucson, surrounded by wax cylinder audio recordings. Buehman Photograph Collection, B93071. If you’d like to use any photos on this blog, please contact us at ahsref@azhs.gov for permissions.

Taking Notes: Nancy Godoy’s Guest Lecture on “Collecting Archival Materials from Mexican Communities”

19 Mar
A photograph from the Mexican Heritage Project. To find this photograph, ask for: #63527 in Picture-Transportation-Railroad-Personnel-1a.Identified in the photo are: Celia Morelos Pain, Brijida Vasquez, Rebeca Andrade (also identified as Rosa Sonoqui, by aquaintance), Ramona Herran Robles, and Juana Lujan.

A photograph from the Mexican Heritage Project. To look at this photograph here at AHS, ask for: #63527 in Picture-Transportation-Railroad-Personnel-1a.
Identified in the photo are: Celia Morelos Pain, Brijida Vasquez, Rebeca Andrade (also identified as Rosa Sonoqui, by acquaintance), Ramona Herran Robles, and Juana Lujan.

As a student in the School of Information Resources and Library Science and a Knowledge River Graduate Assistant here at the Arizona Historical Society, it is inspiring for me to see a former student of both succeed. On Friday March 1st archivist Erin Wahl and I attended a presentation put on by the Society of American Archivists University of Arizona chapter who brought the curator/librarian from the Chicano/a Research Collection at Arizona State University (ASU), Nancy Liliana Godoy to conduct a workshop called “Collecting Archival Material from Mexican Communities.” Godoy, a Knowledge River Scholar and former Graduate Assistant at AHS, presented on the importance of outreach to under-represented communities via non-traditional methods, like Facebook, Twitter, and other technology. Additionally, Godoy has utilized Facebook as an avenue to introduce Chicano/a Research Collection materials to younger audiences. She emphasized the need for archivists to actively be a part of and advocate for the community they serve.

The work that Godoy does at the Chicano/a Research Collection is similar to the efforts made through the Mexican Heritage Project at the Arizona Historical Society. In the 1980s, Patricia Preciado Martin and Thomas E. Sheridan announced a call to action for people in the Arizona community to bring forth photographs of Mexican Americans in Arizona. These four-thousand-plus images include family portraits, businesses, organizations, traditions, celebrations, and much more. The grassroots project did and still does work to document the Mexican American communities of Tucson during the turn of the century from the 1870s-1940s. This term, my graduate assistantship includes making progress towards developing the Mexican Heritage Project further. This progress currently involves the digitization of these images gathered for the Mexican Heritage Project, which will be exhibited as part of the Arizona Historical Society’s contribution to the Arizona Memory Project.