Tag Archives: Buehman Collection

Announcements and Closures

13 Aug

We hope everyone’s having a great summer! We have a few announcements regarding visiting the archives in the near future (since we know announcements can be boring, we’ve illustrated the announcements with photos from our collection!)

First of all – it’s cold in here! I know it’s a hot summer out there in Tucson, but the Reading Room is a steady 60 degrees so if you’re coming in to do research please dress accordingly!

It feels like this outside:

The swimming pool at the Arizona Inn in the late 1930s. Buehman Photograph Collection, BN27219. As always, if you would like to use any photos on this blog, please contact us at ahsref@azhs.gov for permissions.

The swimming pool at the Arizona Inn in the late 1930s. Buehman Photograph Collection, BN27219. As always, if you would like to use any photos on this blog, please contact us at ahsref@azhs.gov for permissions.

But dress for this inside:

Snow covering the cacti at an unidentified home. Buehman Photograph Collection, BN207387. If you'd like to use any photos on this blog, please contact us at ahsref@azhs.gov for permissions.

Snow covering the cacti at an unidentified home. Buehman Photograph Collection, BN207387. If you’d like to use any photos on this blog, please contact us at ahsref@azhs.gov for permissions.

Closures: We are also going to have a few changes to our schedules in the next two months. During the week of August 25th through 29th we WILL ONLY BE OPEN FROM 1:30pm to 4pm. This is because we are in the midst of migrating our catalog and need the time in the morning to do crucial work on that project.

Home library from an album belonging to Fred W. Brown. Main Photograph Collection, 60670. If you'd like to use any photos from this blog, please contact us at ahsref@azhs.gov for permissions.

Home library from an album belonging to Fred W. Brown. Main Photograph Collection, 60670. If you’d like to use any photos from this blog, please contact us at ahsref@azhs.gov for permissions.

We will also be CLOSED from September 17th through September 19th to attend a workshop on preserving A/V materials which will be a great help to us in planning for the continued preservation of hundreds of feet of audiovisual material!

Unidentified woman at the KVOA radio station in Tucson, surrounded by wax cylinder audio recordings. Buehman Photograph Collection, B93071. If you'd like to use any photos on this blog, please contact us at ahsref@azhs.gov for permissions.

Unidentified woman at the KVOA radio station in Tucson, surrounded by wax cylinder audio recordings. Buehman Photograph Collection, B93071. If you’d like to use any photos on this blog, please contact us at ahsref@azhs.gov for permissions.

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Photo Friday: One Gila of a Workout

16 Aug

It’s not easy being a Gila Monster.

Buehman-Subjects-Animals-BN205186. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

Buehman-Subjects-Animals-BN205186. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

 

This photo from the Arizona Historical Society’s Buehman photograph collection, catches a Gila Monster in a gem of a moment, trying to keep his balance and stay on this long pole. Is he doing pull-ups or trying out for the next Olympic gymnastics team? The Gila Monster is particularly special to the Southwest as it is native to this region. It seems that more than a few Tucsonans have a good Gila Monster story.

It’s hard to imagine a lizard more suited to good stories than a Gila Monster. They just seem destined for fiction, and they appear in it often. One of my beloved books as a kid in Ohio was “Gila Monsters Meet you at the Airport” by Marjorie Weinman Sharmat (which we do happen to have here in the archives and which can also probably be found at your local library). This book was also once featured on the television program “Reading Rainbow,” for those of you who want to get a little nostalgic for good PBS programs encouraging reading.

Monsoon season is a prime moment to catch elusive animals like the Gila Monster out in the open enjoying the wave of cool and lovely puddles after the rain. It’s a good moment to take advantage of if you have kids. Take them on a special creative hike. Bring some paper and pens or crayons along and something sturdy to write on. When they see something neat let them stop and write about the experience or take a few minutes to draw what they see. You may not make swift progress up a hill, but you will get some good drawings or writing to put on your fridge and your kids will have something fun to talk about when they return to school. And just because you don’t have kids doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy the same kind of activity. Take some colored pencils with you on your next hike. Take some paper and a pen. Write things down. Sketch. You may find yourself having more fun than you first imagined. And you may find yourself face to face with a Gila Monster.

Clubbing

26 Apr

Women’s History Month is over, but women’s history isn’t! In that spirit, we have pulled together some of AHS-Tucson’s collections that document Arizona women’s participation in local clubs and organizations. These women gathered together to promote charitable causes, support cultural programs, talk business, and meet up with other women for social and educational events. Below are some photographs and snippets about some of those organizations’ papers:

Buehman Photograph Collection

Beuhman – Places – Tucson – Organizations – National Woman’s Party; BN32103

Buehman – Places – Tucson – Organizations – National Woman’s Party; BN32103

This photograph, taken circa 1910, shows women of the National Woman’s Party in Tucson. The banner on the wall reads: “We Demand an Amendment to the United States Constitution Enfranchising Women.” (Buehman – Places – Tucson – Organizations – National Woman’s Party; BN32103. As always, if you see a photo on the blog that you like please contact us about reproduction options at ahsref@azhs.gov.)

MS 912
Tucson Woman’s Club Records, 1900 – 1957 (bulk 1932-1953)

The group was founded in 1900 and was dedicated to the “social and intellectual development of its members.” Contains minutes, yearbooks, and scrapbooks from the Tucson Woman’s Club; activities include art shows, fundraising efforts, educational groups, gardening clubs, music, needlework, and participation in the annual meeting of the Arizona Federation of Women. The club was very active in war work during the World War I and World War II.

League of Mexican American Women, Ephemera file

The League of Mexican American Women is a community action group founded in 1967, and their fundraising efforts go toward educational programs for youth in the community, including scholarships. One of their biggest events is the Fiesta en Xochimilco. The file contains articles and programs related to the group’s activities.

Buehman Photograph Collection

Beuhman – Places – Tucson – Organizations – IOOF- Naomi Rebekah Lodge; BN207609

Buehman – Places – Tucson – Organizations – IOOF- Naomi Rebekah Lodge; BN207609

These women were part of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows Naomi Rebekah Lodge. The Rebekahs are a fraternal order dedicated to community service. According to the information on the back of the photograph, this particular group traveled throughout Arizona establishing new lodges. Circa 1928. (Buehman – Places – Tucson – Organizations – IOOF- Naomi Rebekah Lodge; BN207609. As always, if you see a photo on the blog that you like please contact us about reproduction options at ahsref@azhs.gov.)

MS 632
Town and Gown Club minutes, 1924-1957

Minute books of the Town and Gown Club, which was originally formed as the “University and Town Women.” This group met to hear music, lectures, and poems presented by University of Arizona faculty or guest speakers, and discuss national and local current events.

MS 1163
Women’s Universal Benevolent Association membership ledger, 1895-1896

A ledger documenting members’ names and dues paid for the year. Officers for the year were listed as Mrs. J.A. Black, Mrs. S.H. Drachman, Mrs. A.V. Grossetta, and Mrs. J. Ferrin.

 

Helloooo Rodeo!

21 Feb

While most people in the US know the third week in February as the week of President’s Day, it has a different meaning here in Tucson. RODEO! is on everyone’s lips this week every year as Rodeo enthusiasts, spectators and competitors flock to Tucson for an Old Pueblo tradition. The Tucson Rodeo About page provides a great brief history on the event. Visitors to Tucson should also check out the Tucson Rodeo Parade Museum to learn more about this annual event.

The Arizona Historical Society has a large volume of Rodeo information, from news clippings and pamphlets in our Ephemera collection to photographs to materials within various manuscript collections detailing Rodeo and related events. You can come into the Historical Society to see these for yourself during our open hours. You can also check out some of the Arizona Historical Society’s photos on the Arizona Memory Project website, such as this one of Ed Echols, famed for his roping skills and a notable Tucsonan in many other ways as well.

Ed Echols. Buehman Collection. Portraits, Echols, Ed. #B207570

Ed Echols. Buehman Collection. Portraits, Echols, Ed. #B207570