Tag Archives: 1980s

Dark Sky Week

22 Apr

It’s Earth Day – a great time to think about how we can be better stewards of the planet. But it’s not just Earth Day – this week is also International Dark Sky Week. Tucson has been on the forefront of the responsible lighting movement for many years. With Tucson’s population expanding in the mid 20th century and an increased reliance on street lights and other outdoor lighting, the many observatories and astronomy institutions in the area were in danger of being put out of business. Light pollution was threatening to obscure faint objects in space. Tucson and Pima County enacted laws in the 1970s and 1980s to make sure proper light bulbs were used and that lights were directed down where the light is needed instead of polluting the sky. One of the first things I noticed when I moved to Tucson was how dark it is here at night – so it was very interesting to discover the history behind the dark nights and the beautiful stars that can be enjoyed around town even without a telescope! In honor of Dark Sky Week, here is a photo taken from the Steward Observatory:

Trifid Nebula taken from the Steward Observatory in Tucson in May 1970. PC214f159_G. As always, if you'd like to use an image from this blog, please contact us at ahsref@azhs.gov for permissions.

Trifid Nebula taken from the Steward Observatory in Tucson in May 1970. PC214f159_G. As always, if you’d like to use an image from this blog, please contact us at ahsref@azhs.gov for permissions.

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Columbus Day

14 Oct
As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

Detail of one of our larger world maps. To view this map, come into the archives during our open hours and ask for: G3290 1586 A4 198u MAP. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

Today is Columbus Day which means the Arizona Historical Society Library and Archives in Tucson is closed.

The map above is not ancient. It was printed sometime in the 1980s. It is, however, a copy of a much older map. Making prints of old maps is quite common. Cartography was, and in many ways still is, an art form. Making maps in those long ago times meant having a sense of style and a flair for illustration. Take a closer look at this picture, or come in and view the map in person. There are some amazing creatures pictured on the map above and the side illustration and portraits are done with great attention to detail. These details are what makes these maps, and prints of them, so popular even today. This one is particularly interesting when you take the time to compare the shape of the continents to the much more accurate maps of today. Map making is definitely an art and with an ever-growing collection of over 4,000 maps we see a lot of the cartographic arts here at the Historical Society!

If your kids have the day off school today, why not take a page from the great old cartographers? Make a map! Supply paper and coloring utensils and let the kids make a map of the house or the yard. Steep some tea bags for 30 seconds to a minute and then remove them from the hot water and drag them along the finished maps. This will stain the paper and give them an authentic treasure map look. Make sure to let them dry fully before handling again. You could even give each person a “treasure” (like a candy bar or small toy) to hide and then have them draw a map to it. When everyone’s finished, switch maps and go looking for buried treasure. Bonus points if you’re all wearing pirate eye patches!

Mexican Heritage Project Event this Saturday!

21 Aug
Fliers for the Mexican Heritage Project event can be picked up in the Arizona Historical Society Library & Archives.

Fliers for the Mexican Heritage Project event can be picked up in the Arizona Historical Society Library & Archives.

In celebration of Tucson’s 238th birthday The Arizona Historical Society presents a panel discussion with the founders and leaders of the Mexican Heritage Project- Patricia Preciado Martin, Dr. Thomas Sheridan and Dr. Norma González  

When: Saturday, August 24, 2013, from 10:30-12:00pm
Where: Arizona Historical Society in Tucson (949 E. 2nd Street)
Free to the Public (please enter through the Auditorium doors to the right of the main entrance)
 
Background:
Mexican Heritage Project Photographs: La Herencia del Pueblo was a groundbreaking effort at the Arizona Historical Society to help preserve and tell a story of Tucson’s Mexican American community from the Gadsden Purchase until World War II. During its approximately five years of active collecting by scholars, field historians, archivists, librarians and community members, the Mexican Heritage Project collected business papers, oral histories, diaries and over 4,000 historical photographs directly from community members, all of which were catalogued and added to the permanent collection of the Arizona Historical Society Library and Archives in Tucson. The photographic collection has been accessible to researchers at AHS as individual photos since the mid 1980s, but has never before been viewable or searchable as a united collection. Technology now allows for digital unification of this rich and varied collection of photographs spanning the 1860s through the 1950s. These photographs portray a wide range of subjects, including formal studio portraits of individuals and groups, street scenes, parades, wedding portraits, interiors, ranch scenes, musical groups, workers, theatrical productions, school class photos, and casual family snapshots. If you wish to donate photographs to our collections or if you have additional information to share, please contact us at: ahsref@azhs.gov .
 
This project was supported with funds granted by the Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records Agency, a division of the Arizona Secretary of State, under the Library, Services and Technology Act, which is administered by the Institute of Museum and Library Services.
 
Visit the digital exhibit of the Mexican Heritage Project Photographs collection, which is hosted online by the Arizona Memory Project.
 
 

Taking Notes: Nancy Godoy’s Guest Lecture on “Collecting Archival Materials from Mexican Communities”

19 Mar
A photograph from the Mexican Heritage Project. To find this photograph, ask for: #63527 in Picture-Transportation-Railroad-Personnel-1a.Identified in the photo are: Celia Morelos Pain, Brijida Vasquez, Rebeca Andrade (also identified as Rosa Sonoqui, by aquaintance), Ramona Herran Robles, and Juana Lujan.

A photograph from the Mexican Heritage Project. To look at this photograph here at AHS, ask for: #63527 in Picture-Transportation-Railroad-Personnel-1a.
Identified in the photo are: Celia Morelos Pain, Brijida Vasquez, Rebeca Andrade (also identified as Rosa Sonoqui, by acquaintance), Ramona Herran Robles, and Juana Lujan.

As a student in the School of Information Resources and Library Science and a Knowledge River Graduate Assistant here at the Arizona Historical Society, it is inspiring for me to see a former student of both succeed. On Friday March 1st archivist Erin Wahl and I attended a presentation put on by the Society of American Archivists University of Arizona chapter who brought the curator/librarian from the Chicano/a Research Collection at Arizona State University (ASU), Nancy Liliana Godoy to conduct a workshop called “Collecting Archival Material from Mexican Communities.” Godoy, a Knowledge River Scholar and former Graduate Assistant at AHS, presented on the importance of outreach to under-represented communities via non-traditional methods, like Facebook, Twitter, and other technology. Additionally, Godoy has utilized Facebook as an avenue to introduce Chicano/a Research Collection materials to younger audiences. She emphasized the need for archivists to actively be a part of and advocate for the community they serve.

The work that Godoy does at the Chicano/a Research Collection is similar to the efforts made through the Mexican Heritage Project at the Arizona Historical Society. In the 1980s, Patricia Preciado Martin and Thomas E. Sheridan announced a call to action for people in the Arizona community to bring forth photographs of Mexican Americans in Arizona. These four-thousand-plus images include family portraits, businesses, organizations, traditions, celebrations, and much more. The grassroots project did and still does work to document the Mexican American communities of Tucson during the turn of the century from the 1870s-1940s. This term, my graduate assistantship includes making progress towards developing the Mexican Heritage Project further. This progress currently involves the digitization of these images gathered for the Mexican Heritage Project, which will be exhibited as part of the Arizona Historical Society’s contribution to the Arizona Memory Project.