Archive | Erin RSS feed for this section

“The Terrifying Tale of Pepper the Dog” OR “Puppy Love”

8 Jan

A while ago we had a research request that had us combing through issues of the Tombstone Epitaph looking for a story about a dog who’d fallen down a mine shaft. What we eventually found, was Pepper the dog’s story. It’s a great puppy dog tale, which we’ve scanned so you can read it below. Pet lovers will understand the special bond between Mr. Hicks and Pepper that gave Hicks the courage to go into a mine shaft to save his furry friend. The lesson of this research request is that newspapers often have fun snippets like this that give us ideas of what life was like in the past, and chronicle local adventures that are amazing stories but may never be picked up by the national news. Pick up your own newspaper at home and take a look at the articles. Imagine what someone in twenty, fifty or even a hundred years might think of them! Keep the kiddos occupied this weekend by giving them some paper and crayons and plopping Pepper’s story in front of them. They can illustrate while you get some of your own work done.

Pepper’s story really speaks for itself and we hope you enjoy it.

201312121216_0001

An article from the “Tombstone Epitaph” newspaper detailing the rescue of Pepper the dog. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

Advertisements

Montana Mine Correspondence

22 Nov
I love the letterhead symbol on this one. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

Honestly, I just love the letterhead symbol on this one. If you look closely you can see parts of a tank. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

Lately I’ve been working my way through the correspondence series of the Montana Mine Collection. The majority of the correspondence, outside of that which is related to the financial business of the mine, is actually from a later period of the mine’s existence, when it was owned by a Mr. Hugo Miller. Most of this is the Miller family’s personal correspondence, offering an interesting insight into the lives of this entrepreneurial southern Arizona family.

As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

Living with a miner is never easy! As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

Miller owned an assay office in Nogales and mined on the side. It was not uncommon in the past for men and women with minds for business and an eye for good opportunities to work a mining claim into their business investments. Even now it’s not unusual for private citizens here in Arizona to have ownership of a small mine in the area that they work on periodically as they have free time. The letter you see below is an excerpt from a letter from Mrs. Gladys Miller to a friend and mentions the reality of living with the sort of jack-of-all-trades entrepreneur of a man that Mr. Miller was. From the excerpt you can tell that the Millers had great business acumen, even taking  boarders in their house to make some extra money. This correspondence suggests that the Miller family was a hard working one.

The letter below was interesting because of the context of the attached newspaper clipping. Again, this is a rare glimpse into the daily realities of living in past times. In this case, wartime rationing takes center stage as a friend, Edna, writes to ask whether the newspaper article is true and then asks her friend, Gladys, to purchase extra Nylons for her! Rationing during wartime meant people had to get creative in their daily lives to continue on as normally as possible. Having a friend who could easily get across the border to purchase stockings in Mexico definitely would have been an advantage. This is just another example of how people worked together and created good relationships during times of hardship.

As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

A clever way to circumvent wartime rationing. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

These letters are all great examples of how the correspondence in a collection can yield really interesting insights into the past. Whether it’s fun snippets such as these I’ve shared above or more serious historical connections, correspondence is always a treasure trove of historical moments.

Happy Halloween from AHS!

31 Oct
The Brawny Towel Man and 3 lovely mimes!

The Brawny Towel Man and 3 lovely mimes!

Happy Halloween from the archivists at the Arizona Historical Society in Tucson! If you come to the reference desk today you might catch a glimpse of one of our rare talking mimes (kind of hard to work on the reference desk without talking) or possibly even the Brawny Towel Man and his elusive mustache.

Eagle-Picher Mining Maps

4 Oct

The kids are back in school, the last of the summer days are winding down and we can all see cooler weather not so far ahead, but here at the Arizona Historical Society we haven’t slowed down one bit!  We continue to answer your research needs as well as continuing our work on collections behind the scenes. Recently I completed one of the smaller series in my Montana Mine collection. This was a series containing maps and drawings. I didn’t have much to put in this series. There were only around 10 folders of maps in the entire collection, but they were quite striking. They’re all hand drawn and colored on a typical lined paper. They show different levels of the mine and although I’m not a mining expert myself, you don’t have to be one to enjoy how beautiful these are.

Something goes here.

MS 1473, Montana Mine Collection, Series 5. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

Something else goes here

MS 1473, Montana Mine Collection, Series 5. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

First Photos & the Looming End of Summer

1 Aug
From one of our Western Ways Collections, MS 1255, Box 19, Folder 276, Photograph E. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

From one of our Western Ways Manuscript Collections, MS 1255, Box 19, Folder 276, Photograph E. As always, if you would like to use any of the photos seen here on the blog please contact ahsref@azhs.gov for information on image reproduction.

I feel that this is true of most (all?) archivists: at one point or another something magnificent in their collections jumps out at them and they never forget it. Of course, I’m lucky enough to work in a place where I’m astounded by the collections every single day. But I do remember the first photo that caught my eye when I started working here, and that is the photo above. I now have no recollection of what we had pulled the box and folder for, but I found a slip of paper on my desk yesterday that said: “Remember MS 1255, Box 19, Folder 276, Photo E.” I left myself that note so I would always remember this photo. Now I’m sharing this photo with all of you so you can enjoy it as well! And there is no moment more appropriate than today, as August is upon us and with it the end of summer, the return of students to the University of Arizona and a pick-up in users coming into the Reading Room. The information on the back of this photo reads: “Women guests at Hotel Playa de Cortes on the Gulf of California, at Guaymas, Sonora have to entertain themselves during the day, even resorting to leapfrog on the beach. The men are out on Tom Jamison’s sports fishing cruisers, after sailfish and marlin and dolphin, now in season.” The women in this photo are identified as Barbara Black, Joan Hugg, and Mary Kaster.

So please, enjoy your last bits of summer Tucson! Soon enough school will be starting up and things will be hoppin’ around the Old Pueblo again!